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LoJ: Not Ranked / 13,842' Mount Spalding

Range › Front Range
Quadrangle › Mount Evans
Summit Location › Peak Route Icon N 39° 35' 59.16", W 105° 39' 25.51" (Not Field Checked)

Peak Summary

Mount Spalding is actually an unranked summit north of Mt. Evans that rises less then 300 feet from the saddle that connects it to Evans. Nevertheless, if you're cleaning out 13er summits around Mt. Evans, you'll likely want to go ahead and include Spalding and it's a very short hike from Summit Lake. Since you can drive to Summit Lake in most any passenger vehicle, the short, Class 2 or 2+ hike can be accomplished with no great difficulties. Spalding combines easily with Gray Wolf to the north. In addition, there's a much more interesting and "sporting" route for Spalding/Gray Wolf that involves a hike into a more isolated valley with some beautiful lakes to enjoy and the climb out of that valley can involve at least some brief Class 3 scrambling. 

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