From the Molas Trailhead parking, head south on a connector trail that joins the Colorado Trail about a half mile south of Molas Lake. Follow the Colorado Trail #665 east through mostly open, flowering meadows with enticing views of the Grenadier Range and Snowdon Peaks to the south. The trail maintains elevation as Molas Creek begins to drop away, enters a section of forest and then breaks out of the forest to begin a long descent to the Animas River. Each time we have hiked this section of trail, we have attempted to count the number of switchbacks and each time we have come up with a different number. Suffice it to say there are a minimum of 30. On your way down, enjoy spectacular views of Mount Garfield, Graystone and Electric peaks. From the trailhead to the crossing of the Animas, it's approximately 3 miles.

Eventually the trail deposits you at an easy crossing of Molas Creek (where you can cool your feet from the arduous descent) and then shortly after comes to a well built footbridge across the Animas. Total elevation loss is around 1,700 feet. Once across the Animas, follow along the tracks south and watch for the Elk Creek trail just a short distance away heading up the slope on your left above the tracks. The trail switchbacks up and then begins a contouring path above the tracks over to a low ridge and then Elk Creek. Just before it swings into the Elk drainage, there's a trail that drops back down on the right to some campsites. Once in the Elk Creek drainage, the trail stays on the north side of the creek all the way to the well-known beaver ponds. It's a 3.5 mile hike to there. The trail is well-used and easy to follow and receives regular maintenance. We recall maybe one or two other places where the trail gets close to the creek that would offer a campsite. There are perhaps a couple of spots where the trail crosses a sloping embankment and degrades some. A little over a mile before the beaver ponds, the trail begins to climb above the creek, goes up a side drainage briefly and then gains a flatter bench high above the creek. Once you each that bench, you're less than a half mile from the ponds and the elevation gain is over.

Continue on to the beaver ponds which will be on the right (south side of the trail). There are camp spots right along the trail here, but there are better spots if you cross the ponds on a trail that passes right along the eastern edge of the main pond at the foot of a boulder field. The trail wanders through a few willows, then breaks out into a clearing with several flat campsites on the edge of the trees. This same trail is what you will follow to get to the Elk Creek crossing and then begin a hike up to Vestal Creek and Vestal Basin. On our last visit here in 2011, we saw a cow moose and her calf.



Campsite Locations

Beaver Ponds N 37° 43' 14.64", W 107° 36' 28.44"
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